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Pre-Harvest Pulse Check Meeting – St James, 25 October

Riverine Plains Inc will be holding it’s 2018 pre-harvest paddock walk and meeting at St James on Thursday 25 October from 1:30pm-3:30pm.

We will be visiting the Beggs family chickpea crops (2 paddocks side by side: 1 paddock burnt and 1 paddock stubble mulched), as well as their vetch crop.

The chickpea crop is located at 119 Beggs Road, St James (northern side of road) while the vetch paddock is located at 1085 St James Road, Yundool.

Discussions on the day will include:

  • In-crop management and paddock history for each of the paddocks visited
  • Crop topping/dessication
  • Harvest management, including header set up & fire safety
  • Pulses and soil health, including impact on soil carbon – Dr Cassandra Schefe, Riverine Plains Inc
  • Grazing pulses and livestock – Alison Frischke, livestock and farming systems manager, Birchip Cropping Group
  • Update on market developments/opportunities for lentil, chickpea and other pulses Phil Bowden, Pulse Australia

Attendees do not need to have attended previous meetings or have any prior knowledge of pulse production. The event is free and all are welcome. Light refreshments provided.

For more information please download the October RPI Pulse Check Paddock Walk Flyer . To register your interest please contact: Michelle Pardy on 03 5744 1713 or email michelle@riverineplains.org.au

The GRDC Southern Pulse Extension project is delivered by a consortium of organisations involved in the pulse industry across GRDC’s Southern region.

Canola Systems Field Day – 26 July Daysdale, Coreen, Howlong

Canola systems are being examined as part of a GRDC and Riverine Plains Inc field day to be held on Thursday 26 June, 2018.

The day aims to help growers work through issues around varietal selection, good agronomy and adequate nutrition by visiting trial sites established at Daysdale, Coreen and Howlong.

The field day will begin at 10.00am at the  canola systems trial site at Daysdale, which was established by Farmanco in partnership with Riverine Plains Inc and is designed to evaluate the profitability of different canola systems using hybrid, triazine tolerant, imi tolerant, high oleic and Roundup Ready® technologies.

The second part of the field day involves visits to trials sown as part of a GRDC investment investigating sulphur and nitrogen nutrition in canola. These trials were established to review regionally accepted sulphur and nitrogen application rates for canola in light of the good application histories many paddocks now have.

The field day will commence at 10am at the Maloney family farm, 95 Saffron Road, Daysdale, NSW. The second site visit will be from 12 noon at the Tomlinson family’s farm, Emu Park Road, Coreen. The third site visit will commence at 2:15pm at the Trevethan Family farm, Riverina Highway, Howlong.

This event is free and all are welcome. Signage will be provided on the day and lunch is included. Seed company representatives will be on hand to answer questions about different varieties at the canola systems trial site.

For more information and directions please download the Spotlight on canola systems flyer.

Corowa Update digs into local research

Growers and advisors at the Grains Research Development Corporation (GRDC) Research Update in Corowa this February will hear the latest in local research on retaining stubble.

Riverine Plains Inc is a grower group dedicated to improving the productivity of broadacre farming systems in north-east Victoria and southern New South Wales. The group is one of 16 farming systems and research organisations involved in GRDC’s flagship stubble investment, ‘Maintaining profitable farming systems with retained stubble.’

The investment, which finishes in June 2018, is driving exploration of issues that impact the profitability of retaining stubbles across a range of environments in southern Australia. The aim is to develop regional guidelines and recommendations that assist growers and advisers to consistently retain stubbles profitably.

Riverine Plains Research and Extension Officer Dr Cassandra Schefe said the group established four large, commercial scale field trials at Dookie, Yarrawonga, Henty and Coreen/Corowa (‘Focus Farms’).

“These trial sites compared different stubble management practices and plant establishment, growth and yield,” Dr Schefe said.

“Smaller trials also evaluated the importance of timing of nitrogen (N) application, plant growth regulators, row spacing and variety selection in optimising production in stubble retained systems.

“The large plot field trials were always placed into a cereal stubble, so the sites didn’t continue in the same location every year, but were placed in different paddocks to maintain the same rotation position, with the trial crop being sown into wheat stubble.”

Dr Schefe said while the trial results cannot be directly compared across seasons (2014 to 2017), the effect of different stubble management techniques can be reviewed across years to determine if any single approach appears to consistently yield better.

“Generally, across the past four seasons stubble management has not been a key driver of yield, except for stubble height at Dookie, and addition of N at sowing at Yarrawonga and Henty in 2014,” she said.

“This general lack of effect may be largely due to extreme weather through some of the growing seasons, being heat stress in October 2015, and waterlogging and high cloud cover in winter and spring 2016, which would have overridden any effects of stubble management on yields.

“The timing of flowering had a strong impact on the degree to which these two factors influenced final crop yields”

A key Riverine Plains Inc project finding is that stubble management can directly influence flowering date, which Dr Schefe said may be of value as a risk management strategy to spread the risk of frost damage or water stress in a dry spring.

“This finding is dependent on other factors though, with the high frequency of frosts in 2017 meaning that frost damage was likely to occur over a range of flowering dates.

“The impact of stubble management has certainly differed according to site and season over the past four years.

“It is important to view these results within the context of the seasonal conditions. Therefore, the most productive and profitable approach to stubble management may change according to the season.”

Dr Cassandra Schefe will address the one-day GRDC Research Update at Corowa on Thursday 15 February 2018. Other speakers include Roger Lawes from CSIRO on Understanding the basis behind the yield gap and Rohan Brill from NSW Department of Primary Industries on Critical Agronomy management points for optimising canola profitability.

Go to www.grdc.com.au/events/list/2017/02/grdc-grains-research-update-corowa for the full list of speakers and to register.

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