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Workshops to help farmers & communities manage drought, climate challenges

Riverine Plains Inc has begun delivering workshops to help farmers and communities across southern NSW and north-east Victoria address future drought and climate challenges.

The workshops are being delivered through a new project, Enhancing Community Networks for Drought Resilience in the Riverine Plains, which has recently been funded by the Future Drought Fund’s Networks to Build Drought Resilience program, through donors the Australian Government, Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal and the Pratt Foundation.

The project is designed to help people in Riverine Plains’ communities make personal and business connections to help better prepare for the next drought or climate challenge.

Drought is inevitable part of farming in Australia and severe droughts and climatic events can have huge economic, social and environmental impacts on individuals and regional communities.  A key part of being able to respond is having other farmers, advisors, health and social networks or business services to turn to for advice, or to collaborate with, about key personal and management decisions during drought.

Farmers, business operators and Indigenous custodians in our community all have different experiences of managing drought and climatic events, and there are a vast range of strategies that people have adopted. The workshops will provide a forum to share these different experiences (both the successes and the failures) and will help provide new perspectives, ideas and support to farmers and  rural communities.

As part of the project, 30 workshops will be held in southern NSW and north-east Victoria to connect primary producers, landholders, support services and Indigenous custodians to increase awareness of support, share knowledge and help improve community resilience to future drought and climate challenges.

The first workshop was held as part of the Evan Moll Gerogery Field Day during November, 2021, with participants sharing their experiences in managing mental and physical health during drought, the actions taken to manage their business during previous droughts, as well as changes they are looking to implement ahead of the next drought.

Additional workshops are being planned for late 2021 and the first half of 2022. To learn more about the project and any upcoming community events, please visit www.riverineplains.org.au

The Enhancing Community Networks for Drought Resilience in the Riverine Plains project is funded by the Future Drought Fund’s Networks to Build Drought Resilience program, through donors the Australian Government, Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal and the Pratt Foundation.

New publication: Soil Carbon In Cropping Systems

Riverine Plains Inc has just released Soil carbon in cropping systems, which is a new publication designed to help the region’s farmers better understand soil carbon and the role it plays in crop production systems.

The report summarises the key findings from the Riverine Plains Inc managed project Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues (2012-2015), which specifically aimed to evaluate the potential for soil carbon to be increased by adding stubble residues and nutrients to soils during the summer fallow period.

While the final results from the research trials conducted at Rutherglen, Tocumwal and Culcairn were largely inconclusive when it came to building soil carbon levels from stubble (due to the short-term nature of the project), many other important practical, scientific and economic lessons were learnt along the way. Soil carbon in cropping systems brings together these key lessons, along with farmer case studies and soil science to help local farmers better understand their soil resource.

Soil Carbon in Cropping Systems was funded by the Sustainable Agriculture Victoria — Fast Tracking Innovation Initiative, made possible with the support of the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR) together with the William Buckland Foundation.

Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues (2012-2015) was funded through the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture Action on the Ground program with support from project partners: Murray Local Land Services, the North East Catchment Management Authority and the Victorian Irrigated Cropping Council. The  Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues project

Please follow the link to download a copy of Soil carbon in cropping systems. Alternatively, please contact Riverine Plains Inc on 03 5744 1713 or email info@riverineplains.org.au to order a hard copy version (limited quantity available).