New publication: Soil Carbon In Cropping Systems

Riverine Plains Inc has just released Soil carbon in cropping systems, which is a new publication designed to help the region’s farmers better understand soil carbon and the role it plays in crop production systems.

The report summarises the key findings from the Riverine Plains Inc managed project Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues (2012-2015), which specifically aimed to evaluate the potential for soil carbon to be increased by adding stubble residues and nutrients to soils during the summer fallow period.

While the final results from the research trials conducted at Rutherglen, Tocumwal and Culcairn were largely inconclusive when it came to building soil carbon levels from stubble (due to the short-term nature of the project), many other important practical, scientific and economic lessons were learnt along the way. Soil carbon in cropping systems brings together these key lessons, along with farmer case studies and soil science to help local farmers better understand their soil resource.

Soil Carbon in Cropping Systems was funded by the Sustainable Agriculture Victoria — Fast Tracking Innovation Initiative, made possible with the support of the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR) together with the William Buckland Foundation.

Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues (2012-2015) was funded through the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture Action on the Ground program with support from project partners: Murray Local Land Services, the North East Catchment Management Authority and the Victorian Irrigated Cropping Council. The  Increased soil carbon by accelerated humus formation from crop residues project

Please follow the link to download a copy of Soil carbon in cropping systems. Alternatively, please contact Riverine Plains Inc on 03 5744 1713 or email info@riverineplains.org.au to order a hard copy version (limited quantity available).